Puthan Panam Movie Review

Well, this ought to have been an interesting movie considering the choice of plot that writer-director Ranjith has chosen for his latest flick. A story built around the recent demonitization drive initiated by the Central Government sounds exciting and aroused so much interest as to how the director is going to narrate a script based on such a theme. The excitement and curiosity is laid to rest with a half baked and less inspiring movie that runs out of steam after the initial thirty minutes or so. Puthen Panam is not told in a way Ranjith used to tell his stories and ends up as a disappointing film with no signature of the director.

The movie has a strong protagonist in the form of Nithyananda Shenoy who is a powerful and influential business magnet. Just before the announcement of the banning of five hundred and thousand rupee notes, Shenoy enter into a nefarious business deal and the story develop from there and narrate the consequences that the protagonist face as a result of the deal.

The main problem with Puthen Panam is the lack of a credible storyline to back. The screenplay lacks sense and direction, which is not what we expect from a Ranjith film who has an uncanny way of presenting stories giving a touch of his own that makes it stand apart from the rest. But here the writer in Ranjith is missing the zest and is found wanting at many places and towards the end there is a desperate attempt to somehow wind up the movie. Occasional humour, dialogues and light hearted moments do help the film at times but with such a weak plot and uninspiring screenplay, Puthen Panam just sinks after the initial burst.

What we see here is a forced inclusion of the demonitization part into a story which bear no connection on how the story unfold later and ends. What that needs to be noted is that the currency issue after the initial half an hour takes a backseat and a parallel story of chasing after a gun takes prominence. This seemed too silly. On the one side, we are shown a powerful Shenoy belonging to the underworld clan and on the other side we see the same man running after a boy for a gun which looked too funny.

When it comes to using different slangs in Malayalam films and making it sound so natural, there is only one name in Mollywood and that is Mammootty. True to that reputation, the actor deliver the dialogues imitating the Kasargode style with such finesse and elan which no one can complain about. But the actor in Mammootty is not tested at all as the portrayal of the character of Nithyananda Shenoy was a cakewalk for the him.

There is a long list of supporting actors and among them Baiju, Mamukoya, Indrans, Hareesh, P. Balachandran, Saikumar and Siddhique impressed and made their presence felt. Even then those characters represented by the supporting actors had very limited roles to play which was largely focused on the main protagonist presented by Mammootty.

This time on the technical side, the director has chosen a team which was new to his group. Om Prakash on the camera work stood out while Shaan Rahman’s music wasn’t that catchy. One of the song was totally out of place and created an uneasy feel. Editing was okay but there were some hiccups during those action scenes that happened towards the end of the film. Achu Rajamani’s background score was strictly average.

The director who these days is finding it tough to present stories with more strength and clarity will have to wait for some more time for a hit which is eluding him for quite sometime now. He has the craft and talent in him but the stories he choose should have more depth and the same time the screenplay he pen down should have direction in it instead of aimlessly wandering here and there.